Getting Back to Exercise After Covid-19

A graded return to exercise after any illness is always a good idea and from what we do know about Covid-19 there is certainly not a one size fits all approach.

The severity of the illness, your recovery rate, other co-morbidities and any residual breathlessness all need to be taken into consideration.

So what should you do to get back to exercising safely and where should you start?


Although you might feel anxious about meeting others or getting back to classes there are lots of precautions now in place to help you make that transition with more confidence, talking to your trainer about their new safety measures will help get you going and have a better understanding of what to expect.

From the start it’s important to get a thorough health screen so your trainer knows where and how to help you begin exercising again safely. This will help decide whether it’s safe for you to start back and what sort of a graded return would be appropriate for you. It also gives a good opportunity to benchmark your current state so that you can get a measure of your progress in the weeks to come.

Exercise tests can be used to measure your flexibility, your aerobic fitness and your muscular strength and endurance. Similarly to the health screen these tests are really useful to both measure your current fitness and help decide how to implement your individualised training plan.

‘Ready for Exercise’ means:

  • Asymptomatic for at least 7 days
  • Adequately screened and risk stratified (no signs or symptoms of long covid)
  • Motivated and psychologically ready to participate in exercise (no PTSD for example)
  • Any other pre-existing co-morbidities are under control and stable

If you still find that you are experiencing breathlessness it’s important to be able to quantify this and your trainer can help you do this using the Rate of Perceived Exertion (R.P.E or The Borg Scale) or Talk Test, another is the Visual Analogue Scale to help you understand and develop a self awareness of breathlessness. Your trainer can also help you with breathing coping strategies for when you need to get your breath back in a session or during your day at home – this will build your confidence and help you feel more in control.

Other considerations you might want to include in your training are longer, slower warm ups and cool downs to prepare your body more thoroughly for exercise. You might also try interval sessions (sub-maximal!) so that your can have active recovery rather between bouts of aerobic work to help you manage your oxygen requirements.

Lastly doing a little bit everyday and keeping a diary is a really helpful way to quantify your progress. Managing fatigue with adequate sleep, nutrition and rest is vital.

Jo is qualified with FutureFit for COVID-19 rehabilitation, please get in touch to book a session.


Photo by Марьян Блан | @marjanblan on Unsplash

New Diastasis Protocol

I have had an enlightening few weeks studying Munira Hundani’s new course ‘Diastasis Rectus Abdominus and the Postpartum Core’ which for me, presented a fascinating new framework for both assessment and exercise prescription of the post partum core.


Diastasis Rectus Abdominus (DRA) is a widening of the linea alba (the midline of the abdominal wall) experienced by women during and after pregnancy. Whilst it is normal to experience some degree of separation it should generally resolve naturally postnatally however in approximately 1/3 of women the excessive and prolonged widening prevails adding to a sense of disconnection and dysfunctionality .

Commonly the protocol for fitness instructors, like myself, for dealing with DRA is to present a long list of things to avoid to prevent further widening of ‘the gap’. These might include lifting heavy weights (e.g children), sit-ups, plank, boat pose (Navasana) jack knives, russian twists etc for fear of causing too much Intra Abdominal Pressure (IAP) and worse still increasing the gap. The assessment of the DRA would usually be conducted primarily in supine using a head lift protocol and exercise prescription would typically be progressed dependant on the inter recti distance (or width of the gap)

Hudani’s work paints a much more positive picture for the treatment of DRA as well as a much bigger focus on the individualised journey that success should take accessed via the initial assessment. Crucially she demonstrates how clinical research shows that there is little to no correlation between the DRA itself and formally associated issues such as lower back pain or indeed the ‘type’ of exercise a woman should do. Rather than point the blame at ‘the gap’ she explains that the inter recti distance is just a another part of the abdominal wall that has widened as a whole, coupled with altered breathing and core connection strategies resulting in a mis-management of IAP. She goes on to emphasise the importance of IAP and how harnessing it using the diaphragm and the Transversus Abdominus (TVA) is the key to success.

So what does this mean for women with DRA? Well, by assessing the DRA in positions which prompt more IAP (i.e standing or sitting as opposed to supine – which, she explains, is particularly unproductive for those with increased circumferential laxity) it helps to illicit a better provocation of TVA’s true ability to activate and therefore a ‘way in’ to strategise a stepwise approach for that individual. The idea of using and creating IAP to strengthen the core automatically reduces the fear factor around creating too much IAP. Once the re-training of the diaphragm and TVA has successfully been achieved the list of formally avoided exercises are the very ones which need to be integrated in to optimise core and indeed whole body strength. This means your favourite yoga class, HIIT workouts or Pilates classes are once more back on the table.

If you have been affected by diastasis and are looking for ways to help progress do get in touch via the contacts page for more information.

Photo by Arren Mills on Unsplash

Pilates for Orthopaedic Conditions

I’ve just spent the last couple of months updating my Pilates for orthopaedic conditions knowledge with FutureFit and wanted to focus a bit on exactly why Pilates is so helpful in the treatment of common orthopaedic conditions. Whilst I don’t solely use Pilates in my movement sessions but instead use a range of functional movement protocol the traditional Pilates principles certainly embody and underpin the main focus of exercise prescription for rehab thereby providing a safe and effective recovery.

harlie-raethel-ouyjDk-KdfY-unsplash

Common Orthopaedic Conditions –

  • Back pain (non specific, specific, root nerve pain, disc herniation and piriformis syndrome)
  • Shoulder conditions (rotator cuff tear, impingement and frozen shoulder)
  • Golfers and tennis elbow
  • Hip and knee arthroplasty
  • Arthritis (osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis)
  • Osteoporosis and osteopenia
  • Hypermobility

The Pilates mat repertoire gives a great range of exercises which allow for enough regression or progression to take participants with very limited movement capabilities and progress them in a sustainable way.  The incorporation of the Pilates principles which are taught alongside each exercise help to integrate the breath with core co-contraction, increase body awareness (and therefore autonomy) and focus on the quality of movement.

A tailored programme can offer you many things – principally better alignment and mobility of the spine but also increased muscle strength and endurance, reduced stiffness and improved flexibility, reduced pain, better balance along with improved well-being.

If you are affected by any of these conditions it’s important to seek out an effective exercise programme which meets your needs and minimises your symptoms. Due to covid-19 I am not currently able to offer sessions but feel free to contact me for further advice.

Photo by Harlie Raethel on Unsplash

 

Pandemic Plateau….?

If you’re feeling a growing sense of stagnation with your exercise routine as well as lockdown this may help…the exercise side of things anyway. It generally takes 6 – 8 weeks of training in a specific modality to see the results of your labour so if you’ve been focussing on your fitness in your allocated exercise time from the start of lockdown it’s the right time to give your programme a shake up.

sven-mieke-jO6vBWX9h9Y-unsplash

Regularly mixing up your exercise plan is crucial to achieving results. Periodisation is a method to plan phases of your training to optimise different aspects of your ‘fitness’ thereby maximising your gains whilst also reducing the risk of injury or overtraining….and getting bored!

4-6 week periodisation phases to typically cycle through include a stability phase focusing on consolidating your core connection, peripheral joint stability and proprioceptive awareness. Followed by a strength phase, prioritising load over stability to increase muscle strength and finally, if appropriate, a power phase.

Here’s some examples of how you might progress exercises from a stability phase (12-20 reps 1-3 sets)  into a strength phase (8-12 reps 2-4 sets):

  • Single leg alternate dumbbell shoulder press –> Standing barbell push press
  • Scaption on a single leg –> Standing kettlebell overhead press
  • TRX fly on one leg –> Bodyweight press ups (or decline to increase load)
  • Single leg squat –> Kettlebell goblet squat
  • Single leg Romanian deadlift –> Romanian deadlift
  • TRX hanging bodyweight lunge –> Dumbbell lunges

For more info on tailored exercise training programs drop me a line via the contact page.

 

Another Article on How to Exercise in a Pandemic!

Or, even more boringly titled ‘Appropriate Exercise’…..

I had wanted to get going sooner and magically ‘win the internet’ with incredible Pilates and Corrective Exercise routines to wow the masses but it quickly become apparent that not only was social media at saturation point with offerings but homeschooling had won in the battle between professional development and parenting…..any ground made was largely due to Joe Wicks google searches misdirecting to movewithjo.com….

kari-shea-qa1wvrlWCio-unsplashWith so much on offer and many turning to running to get the most from their allocated Exercise Time it got me thinking about the choices that were being promoted. I read Facebook comments about overloaded abdominals from You Tube workouts, I listened to my friend tell me about her neck pain attempting The 100 whilst doing a virtual Pilates class her work had set up and I witnessed a lot of extremely unsustainable running styles in the park. 
As a corrective exercise specialist I wanted to highlight the importance of self preservation in these exacting times and offer up an Appropriate Exercise Checklist!

Appropriate Exercise Checklist.

  1. Is your body pain free after undertaking new exercise? (symmetrical delayed onset muscle soreness aside) Check your technique, if you’re not sure give it a miss.
  2. Is your body pain free on a normal day to day basis – Are you incorporating maintenance exercises to help vulnerable areas?  e.g pelvic floor, neck or back tension.
  3. Try to think about ways to counter the positions you hold yourself in during the day – like sitting, screen-time to prevent muscle tension and imbalance.
  4. (Similarly to 3) Try to think about supplementing your body with extra movements and positions that you are not getting through your daily life? Reaching, rotating, hanging, squatting, pushing and pulling through a variety of ranges of movement…?
  5. Is the exercise you are doing the right impact for you if you’ve had pelvic floor or joint issues? If you feel you have to run, consider shorter hill sessions to help reduce the impact but still get cardiovascular reward.
  6. Take rest days, vary your exercises and do sufficient stretching.

Take care and stay home!

Photo by Kari Shea on Unsplash

Grip Strength in Older Adults

jeremy-yap-eCEj-BR91xQ-unsplash

I read a PubMed article recently about grip strength as an indicator of health related quality of life in old age and it got me thinking about what we are lacking or sidestepping in our daily lives that means we don’t achieve meaningful grip strength via our normal everyday movements and habits.

The article looked at quality of life in men and women ages 60-94 years old and used the measurement of grip strength to determine overall muscle strength and function. High grip strength is strongly associated with preserved mobility, higher activities of daily living and decreased disability and although it was outlining grip strength as an indicator of ‘general’ health (as opposed to isolationist strength purely at the wrist) there are many habits and environmental factors that rob us of this type of daily movement that would otherwise improve this outcome.

Here’s a list of 5 examples that I came up with to demonstrate ways in which we deny ourselves of those daily ‘movement vitamins’:

  • Coffee grinder – admittedly this is quite hard work but you will be rewarded with not just coffee but a better quality of life….and some would even argue better coffee!
  • Washing machine – imagine all the wringing and squeezing that went on before washing machines, perhaps once or twice a week skip the spin cycle and try and wring out the excess water.
  • Wheelie suitcase – do you wheel your suitcase? Does it glide smoothly across the airport floor?! Think about all that grip work and corresponding arm and core effort if you were to carry it. Not quite as comfortable but perhaps more so than general physical decline!!
  • Car key automatic lock – this seems quite petty but just on principle the price of convenience is robbing us from basic wrist turning actions and even extra movement around the car to lock the doors in the name of convenience.
  • Automatic can opener – another wrist strength robbing device!

To conclude, even though the study just involved a small amount of participants and also incorporated the social aspect of ageing into the equation it makes a good example of how a few simple steps on a daily basis and a bit more awareness can contribute to a healthier outlook.

Grip Strength as an Indicator of Health-Related Quality of Life in Old Age. by Musalek and Kirchengast

Photo by Jeremy Yap on Unsplash

Hotel Workouts

sergio-pedemonte-bmy4kUG4n3M-unsplashIf you travel a lot for work it can be hard to prioritise your own movement let alone specific exercise. This post is an aid to those trapped in their hotel rooms (!) and in need of some body maintenance to cancel out all the sitting, screen watching, suit and work shoe wearing (that also ‘cast’ your body into unhelpful postures).

 

  1. Chest stretch: Arm at 90 degrees (i.e. bent at the elbow) with your forearm against a wall or door frame the stretch the chest open, away from the wall. One arm at a time then switch.
  2. Door frame: Reach up to a door frame and try to extend your arms whilst breathing deeply lengthening on the exhalations. Try to create space from your ears to your shoulders.
  3. Back extensions: Lying prone, chin slightly tucked – on an exhale raise your chest of the floor a tiny bit whilst lengthening your arms/fingertips towards your feet. Also try to draw your shoulders back as if opening your chest.
  4. Childs pose: Sit back on your heels stretch your arms forward onto the floor.
  5. Hamstring stretch: lying supine stretch one leg up – use a belt or tie around the foot to get leverage (keep the other knee bent and try not to press/flatten your lower back) Switch legs.
  6. Sit ups: support the head if necessary, deep exhale as you come up.
  7. Plank: On your elbows – keep breathing, back of the neck long don’t drop your chin.
  8. Childs pose: same as before but with the palms up.

Note: Written descriptions of exercises and movements can be lost in translation! So if these do not translate easily for you do get in touch via the contact form. Readers who have had been having sessions will recognise the cues!

Photo by Sergio Pedemonte on Unsplash

10 Min Exercise Ideas

It’s easy to do exercise for exercise’s sake particularly at this time of year when the internet is awash with new year’s resolutions & calls to reinvent yourself through exercise! What we really need to access through our, let’s call it, ‘planned movement’ is an intended physiological response – meaning not just ticking something off the ‘to do list’ but creating a more nourishing exercise programme that provides ourselves with the missing movements that our modern lifestyles do not afford us. 

Here are three 10 minute exercise ideas (50 seconds per exercise with 10 seconds rest) to try, you could do them as is or cycle through just some of the exercises for a different focus.

10 minute Full Bodyweight Workout (for strength)

Squats (with band pull apart to add in some shoulder blade work)
Wood chops (alternate sides)
Side lunges (or jumping jacks…)
Wall sit
Rows
Band pull ups (with band under foot to work shoulders/core)
Push ups with push back (regular push up half or full with a shell stretch back between reps)
Hovers on all 4’s (or plank)
Hip lift with chair (supine with legs elevated, push hips up)
Leg extensions (supine with alternate leg extension for abdominal load)

10 minute Correctives (for transitioning to better alignment)

Supine half dome thoracic stretch
Supine half dome thoracic stretch, in slightly different place on the spine
Rhomboid push up
Shell stretch (try palms up & down)
Side neck stretch with median nerve floss left
Side neck stretch with median nerve floss right
Calf stretch over half dome left
Calf stretch over half dome right
Long arm reach
Rotator cuff band pull with slow return 

10 minute Evening Stretch (for counteracting the effects of too much sitting)

Chest stretch against wall left
Chest stretch against wall right
Hip rock left
Hip rock right
Pigeon left
Pigeon Right
Adductors knee bent left
Adductors knee bent right
Supine over half dome
Head nods

If you have attended classes or currently train with me most of these will be familiar – if not, videos to follow……. or drop me a line!

Are You Sitting Comfortably?

In sessions we are often trying to ‘undo’ or improve on aches & pains (limitations) we have, whether it be through bad alignment or injury. Both of these are usually caused by having poor alignment resulting in our inability to maintain a sustainable functioning muscle balance.

If much of your day is spent sitting or sedentary  your body will be cast into that shape, there will be adaptations which define your body as ‘a sitter’ – even if you did a ‘workout’ (whatever that may be). What you do for the majority of your day will dictate how your muscles are conditioned. There will be specific movement pathways that your lifestyle does not expose you to due to ‘modern living’ & in particular the time saving devices we now have at our disposal e.g shopping online instead of walking to the shops & carrying it home, buggies, washing machines, cars etc.

In order to counteract this we need to look at steps we can take to change our environments to afford more movement time, different working postures or movement breaks spread out across the day.

14322757_1152367408139894_4920083886017136014_n3 steps to improving your ‘sitters body’.

  • Work on corrective exercises to help counter the effects of sitting.
  • Try to sit & do the movement we’re already doing with better alignment. See the picture on the left for ideal sitting alignment.
  • Look at ways we can change our environments & lifestyles to incorporate more activity where possible.

 

Take a look back at my post on 6 Ways to Stretch at Your Desk for some ideas on how to counter desk sitting.

6 Ways To Stretch At Your Desk

As sitting is now described as the new smoking I guess if you can fit some stretches into your workday it’ll just be the equivalent of vaping….maybe?! Anyway, whether you’re standing or sitting for long periods intermittent stretching and movement will help curb muscle tightness & pain as well as go some way into preventing the adaptive shortening of muscles.

Try to do them throughout the day instead of all in one go for get the most benefit – setting an alarm to move every hour will help to remind you.

phot_3.jpg

 

1st row: Triceps, arm down back into lat stretch as you bend to the side (second picture).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2nd row: Hip flexor stretch on chair. Anchor the knee and drive the pelvis forward to open the front of the hip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3rd row: Neck stretch, ear to shoulder into levator scapula stretch as you turn your head hold & try to place nose to shoulder too.

 

 

 

 

 

 

4th row: Hamstring stretch making sure you keep the hips parallel and tail bone sticking out.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5th row, left: Rhomboid push up in vertical or chest opener. From the position pictured bring your elbows in together.

5th row, right: Piriformis / glute stretch – lean on the knee to increase the stretch. Untuck your tailbone.